The Acadia National Park Science Symposium provides a forum to learn about science taking place in the region and to interact and build collaborations with scientists, educators, students, park staff, and others working in a range of fields.

All sessions will be recorded and made available to the public.

2022 Symposia

Research in Acadia Then & Now
Wednesday, October 19, 2022

At this time we are planning an all-day, in-person event at Schoodic Institute. More details will be provided in August.

Intertidal Research in Acadia
Wednesday, March 2, 9 am – 3:30 pm via Zoom

This daylong session included four panels of invited speakers covering National Park Service priorities, broad-scale research across the intertidal, and research specific to the rocky intertidal and soft sediment intertidal zones.

Draft Agenda (PDF version)
Presentation on evaluation of Acadia intertidal zone workshops to date (link to recording)

Visitors to Acadia (link to recording)
Tuesday, February 22, 12-2 pm via Zoom

This session featured presentations by Laura Cohen, Acadia National Park Visitor Experience and Education, and Adam Gibson, Acadia National Park Social Scientist.

2021 Virtual Symposia

Early Career Opportunities in Acadia National Park
Thursday, December 9, 2021, 3-5 pm via Zoom

This session will feature different representatives of the park and partners presenting on the varied opportunities for students and other early-career scientists and educators interested in working in Acadia in 2022.

Speakers:

Jesse Wheeler, National Park Service, on opportunities with Acadia National Park and Student Conservation Association
Kate Petrie, National Park Service, on education-related positions in Acadia National Park
Hannah Webber, Schoodic Institute, on internships, fellowships, and technician positions at Schoodic Institute
Stephanie Clement, Friends of Acadia, on Summit Stewards and other opportunities
Chelsea Bitting, National Park Service, Opportunities with Scientists in Parks

See this page for updates.

 

Climate Adaptation Using Resist-Accept-Direct (RAD): Examples in Acadia National Park and Bandelier National Monument

The Resist-Accept-Direct (RAD) framework helps managers make informed, purposeful choices about how to respond to the trajectory of environmental change and supports collaborations across large landscapes. This symposium will feature speakers discussing RAD-informed projects in two national parks, and will include Indigenous perspectives from both areas. After the presentations, breakout group discussions will address questions to help identify obstacles to making RAD decisions and practices that may help managers and researchers use this approach at other locations.

Featuring:

  • Status of RAD thinking in NPS, Gregor Schuurman, National Park Service, Climate Change Response Program
  • Examples in Acadia National Park, Abe Miller-Rushing, National Park Service, Acadia National Park, and Nick Fisichelli, Schoodic Institute at Acadia National Park
  • Wabanaki perspectives on climate adaptation, Darren Ranco, University of Maine
  • Examples in Bandelier National Monument, Scott McFarland, National Park Service, formerly at Bandelier National Park (currently at NPS Natural Sounds and Night Skies)
  • Pueblo perspectives on climate adaptation, Kai-t Blue-Sky, Pueblo of Cochiti

Link to recording and supplemental materials:

Resist-Accept-Direct (RAD)—A Decision Framework for the 21st-century Natural Resource Manager  (National Park Service)

Announcing the Resist-Accept-Direct framework (Schoodic Institute)

National news coverage of the RAD framework (Schoodic Institute)

 

2020 Symposia

An overview of research in the park in 2020
Monitoring change in Acadia National Park
Workshop: Early career opportunities and internships in Acadia
Adapting to the Future
Wabanaki knowledge, perspectives, and science in Acadia
Workshop on research permits, reporting, data sharing, and science communication

Past Symposia

2018 Acadia Science Symposium Proceedings and Presentations.

2016

2014

2012

2011